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August 16, 2006

Links Du Jour 08-16-06

  • Canadian Trademark Blog - Ron Coleman at Likelihood of Confusion gives us the heads up on the brand new which I think looks like a great source for information on Canadian company naming and legal information. This couldn’t come at a better time: yesterday I noted that that Canada is now the national brand in the world. Welcome to the blogosphere, CTB.
  • Rolling Stones roll out European tour - Primal Branding’s Patrick Hanlon has noted that the Stones are at it again, and we all can learn a great deal about building an enduring brand name from the in the world, whose brand equity has simply never been stronger. Hanlon likens their success to the “marketing equivalent of releasing a VW Beetle, iPod or Netflix every 24 months” and tells us that The Rolling Stones got their name from a Muddy Waters song (I’m a fan, I didn’t know that), Mick Jagger is a living icon (the lips are as iconic in US and UK culture as Apple’s apple logo or the VW logo) and their songs are now “sacred words.”
  • Most interesting article in this past weekend's papers - Bookofjoe points out some interesting naming changes from a recent that made all the difference. Scott Fitzgerald wanted to call his first big novel “Trimalchio in West Egg” instead of “The Great Gatsby”. Movie and song names are also difficult: The Beatles wanted the song “Yesterday” to be titled ”Scrambled Eggs.” Problems like these keep a naming company like ours busy.

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Posted by William Lozito at August 16, 2006 9:03 AM
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1 Comment

I don't think that Beatles story is true. Paul used "Scrambled Eggs" as a kluge until the lyrics caught up with the music, simply because the meter of "Scrambled Eggs" fit the musical phrase that we now know as "Yesterday."

That's how I larned it, anyway.

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